A walk down memory lane

As you might already know, it’s Asiapac Books’ 35th anniversary this year. Having been in the book industry since 1983, we want to showcase just a bit of our catalogue of out-of-print books. Perhaps you’ve seen these before back in the day?

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Labour Pains was the first book published by Asiapac Books. It is a comedic book on gender inequality illustrated with cartoons and comic strips.

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These four titles are examples of paperback classics and Asian literature published by Asiapac Books in the 1980s.

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Two award-winning titles illustrated by renowned Chinese artist Lu Yuan Guang.

Check out more of our publications both old and new at our 35th anniversary comics exhibition today (it’s free)! We’re located at the Level 8 Promenade of the National Library Building from now until 9 December 2018. Oh, and don’t miss out on our upcoming events (updated list on Facebook or Eventbrite)!

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The ongoing debate: Singapore’s hawker culture

Amidst the discussion concerning the place of Singapore’s hawker culture in UNESCO’s list, let us take a trip down memory lane and reminisce the beginning of it all.

Hawkers

Do you recognise any of the above hawkers? Can you name the food that each of them sold and the sounds that they made?

Not only did the smell of delicious food permeate the streets of Singapore, much din was made too: hawkers shouting to advertise their food, the highly-anticipated ringing of the ice-cream bell, the familiar “tok-tok” rhythm by the bamboo apparatus of the Tok Tok Mee man…

Many immigrants in 1900s Singapore relied on food hawkers on the streets for their daily meals. Besides famous dishes like braised duck, noodles and nasi lemak that are still rampant all over the country today, there were many other types of food sold that we no longer can find here.

These include…

Lok Lok

… Lok Lok…

Pig's Ear

… Pig’s Ear…

Grilled Squid

… grilled squid…

Crocodile

… and even crocodile meat!

Due to hygiene reasons, these cannot be sold the same way in Singapore anymore.

In addition, the clean and well-maintained hawker centres that you walk past every day are a far cry from what it used to be! Most of the hawkers in that day carried their stalls with them and set them up wherever there were customers.

Hawker 1

Hawker 2

Hawker 3

Hawker 4

What do you remember from the hawkers in the past? Do you have similar stories to share?

Tell us more at our book launch tomorrow! Get your hands on our latest graphic novel, Once Upon A Singapore… Traders, where we show you the hawker culture that has made Singapore what it is today. Details: The Arts House, 10 November 2018, 2pm-3pm. Register here for free!

Get to know: Feng Zikai

Born in Zhejiang, China in 1898, Feng Zikai (豐子愷) was one of the first artists to specialise in caricatures and comics. His works span a wide range of topics, from classic Chinese poetry depictions to observations of day-to-day life. Although they are informed by deep and profound concepts, his comics are idyllic, light-hearted and relatable to all types of readers.

As our 35th anniversary flagship publication, Asiapac Books will be publishing Feng Zikai’s selected comics in collaboration with Dolphin Books (China), in a set of five books titled Selected Comics of Feng Zikai.

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An embodiment of the fine balance between intellect, artistry and child-like wonder, Feng Zikai is a key inspiration for our work. Some of his artworks masterfully depict classic Chinese verses, while others muse about everyday village sightings. Regardless of their inspiration, all of them carry a sense of peacefulness and serenity, painting a blissful picture of life.

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Occasionally, Feng Zikai approaches situations with humour, keeping his drawings light-hearted and cheerful. As many of his illustrations portray everyday situations, even contemporary viewers will find them relatable. Other illustrations make more profound observations that reflect upon humanity and its inadequacies.

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Having lived through the 20th century, it is not unusual to observe external influences in Feng Zikai’s work. Sometimes, they portray non-Chinese characters. Other times, the works themselves bear English words. These illustrations juxtapose traditional living with new concepts, creating a fresh blend of cultures.

new doc 2018-06-06 15.43.11_3 copyWe hope to bring joy to a new generation of readers by sharing Feng Zikai’s timeless classics. His work is a constant reminder of the immense beauty and tenderness that still exist in our everyday lives.

Look out for the book launch details soon!

 

Unearthing the Roots of Chinese Medicine

Chinese herbal medicine, drug, food

Image: Pietro Jeng

Most of us have heard of yin and yang – the two forces that, in Chinese philosophy, power the natural world. Our understanding, however, is often limited to a vague impression of their exact roles; many don’t realise how the forces, as a fundamental part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), continue to thread through modern thinking.

TCM itself is still very much an active part of life today – a tenet of Chinese history and tradition, it is also something many Singaporeans continue to turn to when ill. Learning about TCM is thus about both the past and present, something that we recognise in our Essential Chinese Medicine series and Essence of Traditional Chinese Medicine comic book.

 

 

Essential Chinese Medicine features four titles, each covering different aspects of TCM: Health Tonics, Improving Blood CirculationRelieving Wind and Restoring Balance. The books describe the most well-known herbs used in each field, going into incredible detail about medicinal effects, purchasing and storing methods, and easy recipes – Health Tonics alone, for instance, describes 54 popular herbs! The books cover both the therapeutic and practical effects of TCM, providing a truly well-rounded look at the subject.

All four Essential Chinese Medicine books are edited by Professor Zhang Bao Chun and Professor Chen Yu Ting, postgraduate instructors at the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine. They draw on their wealth of knowledge to shed light on an otherwise complex topic, carefully clarifying and simplifying information for readers. The books are especially relevant for Singapore readers too, as the featured herbs are amongst the most commonly used right here on our island.

Essence of Traditional Chinese Medicine is even more accessible, employing illustrations, diagrams and comics to explain the text. It spans from ancient Chinese theories about the human body to the modernisation of TCM, proving how this branch of medicine has both survived and evolved.

Whether you are simply a curious beginner or a TCM-enthusiast, our two series are refreshing, informative takes on a truly fascinating subject. Learn about the lives of famous Chinese physicians from light-hearted comics, or try your hand at a few simple, wholesome recipes. TCM, after all, has become much more than just a matter of health, but a philosophy and spirit with far-reaching influences.